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Tag Archives: Amanda Maxwell MHR-HRBS-EKAS

Emirates Airline fired my friend for supporting me

Emirates management fired a good friend of mine today out of blue for something she did at the end of last year.

Namely, she commented my article on Truth About Emirates Airline Management Facebook page. My friend wasn’t given a notice period or warning. She was just fired for writing a comment on my article so many moths ago. She didn’t lie about it. She was honest and straight until the end. Emirates managers do not care about honesty. They don’t care about their staff. They left my friend on the street with debts and no money for a rent.

This particular friend of mine supported me all the way through my fight. She was always open in her support, always wanting Emirates to become a better place for all. This is why she was brave enough to ask right questions at the Open forum for ground staff and to speak clearly and loudly about inhumane conditions in Emirates Airline. I guess managers never forgave her that and just waited for a “right moment” to terminate her service. But nobody would expect that they will do it in such a cruel way, suddenly and without giving her a chance to prepare herself. They just took away her whole life in Dubai from her in five short minutes.

To be honest, I wanted to stop writing this blog. My previous article on managers’ salaries supposed to be my last one. But this information changed everything. I don’t know why EK managers decided to fire my friend now for something she did so long time ago. What crosses my mind at this moment is a revenge to me and my blog after my last article. It wouldn’t be the first time for Airport Services Divisional Vice Presidents Anoma Manuel and Walter Riggans to revenge on staff for speaking up.

Let me remind you that I was also fired without notice period or any money in my pocket and was literally kicked out from the airport building like a dog. I couldn’t even get the information about my next steps for visa cancellation process because my HR profile was cancelled at the spot. I was left in the dark and on the street. Same happened to my friend.

I wanted you to know this. There is no humanity or decency among EK managers. They just keep responding to complaints and bad working conditions with cruelty, pressure and service terminations.

Shame on you, ruthless people. Shame on you in your expensive villas, with your 100.000AED salaries and bonuses. 

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Open forums for Cabin Crew

Seems that Mr.Terry Daly (Divisional Senior Vice President Service Delivery) has finally acknowledged the problems that his department has. Since Emirates Airline managers always try to “resolve” their problems by using force and pressure first, I am not surprised that Mr.Daly introduced new sickness certification process without any discussion with his staff or possibility for receiving crew’s feedback on his unpopular decisions.

According to some unofficial data around 1000 crew called sick two days ago which is enormous number for already suffering Service Delivery department. This fact, along with huge turnover rate, drop in service delivery quality, lack of crew and crew’s writings on the Internet may forced Mr.Terry to try and find a different solution besides the unpopular benefit cuts. Mr.Daly promised to organize some Open forums for cabin crew where they will discuss problems and issues.

Mr.Terry Daly's call for Open forums

Mr.Terry Daly’s call for Open forums

Now, these open forums were already organized in EKAS (Airport Service) department without much success (anyway, Ms.Anoma was moved to another position soon after the forums). The absence of success is only normal when your managers think that their participation at Open forum is an act of good will and that they are there to “help” their employees. No open forum ever will resolve any departmental issue until EK managers start to comprehend that they are not there to “help” (which was Ms.Anoma Manuel‘s vision on forums’ purposes) but to work together with their team and, actually, help themselves. Managers are not there to help, but to do their job and make decent working conditions for all.

While Ms.Anoma Manuel’s Open forum turned out to be a farce which resulted with my service termination as she couldn’t handle honest and desperate questions in any other way than to punish me for asking them, I hope that Mr.Terry Daly will have more intellect and reason than Ms.Anoma to hear what his staff has to say without firing them.

I know that it is hard to achieve Ms.Anoma Manuel’s levels of mismanagement, bullying and incompetence, therefore I truly hope that Mr.Terry Daly will use these Open forums to really show some care for his staff and to deal with burning issues with success. This blog started with Ms.Anoma’s incapability to lead her department. Let’s hope that it will all end there and that nobody will have to go through things I have been through with Ms.Anoma as my manager.

Good luck to Mr.Terry Daly at his Open forums.

And just to remember how the “Open forum” looked like in EKAS department: 

 

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Happy New Year!

Before I go to celebrate New Year’s eve I just wanted to send special thank you note to all the people who participated in the termination of my employment out of fear that they will actually have to do their jobs and appreciate their employees for bringing them much money and bonuses each year.

I may not be able to find a New Year eve’s dinner for 2 AED, but since I didn’t get even that much at the end of my service I have nothing to worry about tonight. As old saying in Serbia says: No money, no problem. Hope you will not abuse this saying as you are abusing the “you always have the choice to leave” one.

To

Ms. Anoma Manuel (former EKAS),

Mr.Abdulaziz Al Ali (HR),

Ms.Sophia Panayiotou (former HR),

Mr. Mohammed Mattar (EKAS),

Ms.Michelle Carswell (HR),

Ms.Amanda Maxwell (HR),

Mr. Maktoom Mohd. Hassan (HR)

I wish you Happy New Year and many more bonuses. There is one catch, though: I wish that you earn those bonuses by yourself, at the expense of your own work and health. I also wish you better understanding of your job positions and positions of those who work on lower positions. I wish you not to send sick people home without any compensation, not to terminate people who ask for dignified working conditions, not to threaten your employees with punishments and prison and I really wish you more love and sense of responsibility for all of those employees who didn’t have the luck to be local or to have western passports.

To all of my readers: Happy New Year, be strong, always defend your rights and dignity and see you next year. Same place, same time. 

Dragana


2000 Emirates flight attendants resigned in September this year?

I remember my little chat with HR manager Mr.Maktoom Mohd. Hassan after the Open forum for ground staff (when he also told me that I am “finished”). When I asked him to tell us his opinion on huge resignation rate in Emirates Airline (specifically in Airport Services) he told my friend and me that staff turnover in Emirates Airline is “usual for every big company”.

DSVP of Airport Services Mr.Mohammed Mattar, on the other hand, admitted that he is short of staff. “I don’t have enough staff so I am forcing you to come to work” he said. I guess that this logic is very simple and makes managing of huge department very easy. I was hoping, though, that managers don’t use this logic on cabin crew, since there is more to gamble with on board by forcing tired staff to fly, than when you force people to come and seat at the counters for hours without a break.

There are couple of ways to force cabin crew to work more. One is to make them fly more than certain, prescribed by law and healthy, number of hours per month and another one is to make their layovers very short. Both are illegal and both are used by Emirates Airline as ways of compensating a serious lack of trained flight attendants.

My former colleagues boarding agents (still working) tell me that there is a visible lack of cabin crew, that flights are delayed because of it and there is even a widespread story that two flights were recently cancelled due to this lack of flight crew.

I have received several e-mails from members of EK cabin crew recently, mentioning some of the reasons why they resign in number that even endangers safe flying and operation, but one information left me speechless. One of those e-mails claims that 2000 flight attendants left the company just in September this year.

Whenever I read people’s stories and decide whether to publish them or not, I always wonder about their motives to write to me and their perception of reality. In this case, even if this number is not plausible, it proves the devastated state of flight crew morale. And who would like to fly with indifferent, tired and unhappy crew?

Of course, nobody from EK management cares about staff’s morale. Nobody thinks it’s important. Managers have huge salaries and bonuses and they keep themselves motivated. Flight crew, ground staff and passengers are there to ensure their bonuses. Once these managers are done with Emirates Airline they will return to their western homes. They will never consider themselves responsible for their employees’ misery and devastation of company’s image, they will never think that somebody is lying sick somewhere because of their exploit policies, they will never remember all those people who came to contribute to “making the history” and who became history instead.

Here are just some of the problems of cabin crew in Emirates Airline.

  1. “Lousy shoes that cause many industrial injuries that the company tries not to accept blame for. A cheap quality uniform that doesn’t wear or wash well. Staff have to buy replacements for parts of the uniform. Yes, they have to buy new shoes or wear them for one year exactly before they can get new ones for free of charge.”
  2. “There is a staff shortage as many experienced crew left and sometimes managers put resignation processing on hold as they can’t process them quick enough. Resignations run around 250 plus staffs a month. Now going to over 350.”
  3. “Some crew is doing over 120 hours a month flying and are exhausted and falling sick regularly. Some fly sick as they are told no upgrade if they are sick.”
  4. “They opened a walk in clinic in HQ which is full and crew waits for hours after a flight to be seen. Before cabin crew could self certify sickness for up to seven days. Now they are bringing new system to make crew come to see the nurse every two days so they can’t recover properly and just go to work like machines.”
  5. “If crew is even 1 minute late they get into serious problems and marked absent. But if plane and flight is delayed they are expected to work for nothing.”
  6. “Cabin crew is bullied, exploit, tired and fatigued.”
  7. More on cabin crew’s problems here.

Here is one particularly interesting e-mail from one cabin crew:

Cabin crew's e-mail. 2000 crew resigned in September.

Cabin crew’s e-mail. 2000 crew resigned in September.

they have reduced some allowances (like 120 eur to 90eur in Nice which I think is stollen a lot if mobey for 24hrs). I think way bigger problem are the illegal short layovers where ek pays fines rather than giving the crew longer stopover time but this is another topic. Oh, and there’s waaaaaay more crew resigning than 250 per month.  Only in sept it was around 2000.
Can I pls add one thing. Im currently in the xxx and I have some very new girls on my flight who haven’t finished their 6month probation yet. They told me they get weighed now before the start of the training, after the training, before getting a uniform AND after probation on their graduation day.  When i joined 2012 theree was no scales whatsoever.I think this says a lot about the values of this company. Some of the newbys look anorectic to me. They cannot close any overhead locker and god forbid I have no clue how would these 21year old 178cm and  48kg girls evacuate 500ppl in 90 sec with jammed doors, injured pax, heavy equipment etc
For ek its all about image and not evaluation of real situations. Everyones fatigued, scared and demotivated.i truely dont know when was the last time I saw someone who is happy with ek as an employer. People have to know how this system is rottening!!!
All the best Dragana,

And if someone has to say something in Emirates Airline’s defence, I would politely ask them to explain first the fact that Kevin Griffiths, Senior Vice President of Cabin Crew was demoted recently with a serious remuneration cut.

Before you continue to question everything that is said here, please explain first why some high levelled EK Human Resources managers were fired recently without a chance to even clean their desks before exiting the company?

Please explain why you didn’t publish results of the survey on employees’ satisfaction yet as you have promised?

Mr. Abdulaziz's (Head of EK HR) promise to publish result of a long gone survey on employees' satisfaction

Mr. Abdulaziz’s (Head of EK HR) promise to publish the results of a long gone survey on employees’ satisfaction

Dear managers, you can not keep denying things written on this blog and yet keep the reasons for firing and demoting big name managers as a secret. Something is obviously very wrong as people on this blog are pointing out for 4 months now.

But be careful in your answers though as you must write your comments online in the way your company has instructed you recently. I guess many managers do not follow these rules in their every day work (respecting people, differences and cultures), therefore they do not feel obliged to follow them online. And I guess that threats became usual and desirable way of making employees behave like managers want them to behave, so remember those of you, regular employees who want to write an honest comment here: you are tracked and observed by your company when writing online (at least this is how this first “rule” tries to scare you):

Mr.Jon Conway's (DSVP-UAE Airport Operations) instruction on how to behave online

Mr.Jon Conway’s (DSVP-UAE Airport Operations) instruction on how to behave online

I guess we just need time to see how much exactly is current Emirates staff turnover “usual” for big companies.

Happy New Year.


When people become wolves always hungry for more money

I’ve said this couple of times here and these “The National” articles just confirm it: you give love at the places you receive love; same goes for the hate. Place that lures people to come and live in it just in order to drain money from them, can’t expect bright future for itself. This kind of place loses all the humanity, money becomes God and people turn into wolves, biting each other for a coin (just like EK managers do).

I am afraid that the whole planet turned into one greedy place where people forgot that they are all connected and that happiness of others means happiness of oneself. But there are places in the world where love still exists and where money didn’t kill all the nobleness. You decide if you live in one of those places and whether you are contributing to its sustainability or to its devastation (like many EK managers do). You decide if you are truly happy or miserable as hell although you have (bloody) money and all that goes with it.

Articles:

UAE expats priced out of their lives

http://www.thenational.ae/business/personal-finance/uae-expats-priced-out-of-their-lives

I‘ve recently come across a growing number of people who are packing up and leaving the UAE, others who are seriously contemplating it, and many who are being vocal about their pain, but are staying put – for now.

Add to this snippets of conversation overheard about this when I’m out and about.

The problem is the cost of living.

Expats who come on bumper packages and have the increasingly pricey outgoings of rent and education covered – wholly or partially – won’t be affected by this. It’s long-term residents and entrepreneurs who are being hurt the most, especially those with children of school-going age.

And these two groups of people are exactly what any city needs; they choose to live here and want to stay, but cannot afford to.

In the past fortnight alone I have discovered that a handful of neighbours will be leaving the country – one family in particular embodies what’s happening: they’ve been in Dubai for a couple of decades – with one short-term hiatus in the late 1990s owing to family circumstances – and they’re torn. Both the husband and wife have built up businesses in the UAE, their three children are very settled and love their lives, and they genuinely believe that Dubai has a lot more to offer than what’s available back home. But the double whammy of rising fees along with not being paid on time by clients has hit them hard.

This is a family that saves but can’t any more – and they’ve been dipping into savings over many months to survive. Their life lurches from one term’s school fees to the next. And it just doesn’t work for them.

But they’re struggling with the decision to leave.

Everything’s in place for them to go come the end of the year: they have a yard sale in a week and grandparents are over to spend one last Christmas in the UAE sun.

But it’s tough. It’s not just that they’re saying goodbye to special friends, the only life their children know and their hopes for their futures here, it’s also that this time it’s different: going means never coming back, and that’s affecting them. A lot. They can’t come back because they would never be able to afford entry level prices to live in the UAE once again. Finding a home, for example, would be a major barrier once they give up their current lease. Their place is going for Dh280,000 these days, but they pay Dh150,000 – and they only moved in a year- and-a-half ago.

Their basic outgoings add up to Dh600,000 a year. That’s school fees for three, rent, utilities and other basic, red-tape and living costs. They could do a lot with that money back home – where schooling is free.

I’m told that when confronted with a dilemma and not being able to work out what’s best for them, this couple tosses a coin and goes with fate.

I don’t believe they’ll be doing that this time round. It just doesn’t make sense to stay.

A view echoed by friends who got together earlier in the month to celebrate someone’s 40 years in the UAE. Many of these long-term expat residents are upping sticks too. Most don’t have children at school, but they also find that the UAE isn’t what it used to be.

Of course there will always be people who bemoan a past lost for ever. Cities change – but this isn’t just about a fast-paced metropolis evolving, it’s also very much about how difficult it is to live in a place where you cannot save, and where you have no benevolent government that will pay your way when you go back home. So the cash-flow crunch dictates that people either live irresponsibly – not providing for the future – or make very emotional decisions and go elsewhere.

But some – I call them “expat prisoners” – can’t leave. These are people who have superb track records in their fields and cannot get jobs back home because of their age. The big question is: if everything they earn goes out to pay for their lives and if there’s no hope of them saving, or of creating additional streams of income, is it worth staying?

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Some are trying to figure out how to do both: stay and stem the money haemorrhage. I met someone last weekend who is contemplating moving to Ras Al Khaimah or somewhere in between there and Dubai, purely to get out of the rent hell that is her Dubai at the moment. Not only has her rent been put up by 20 per cent (take it or leave it), but she has just been told that no money will be put into the property as it seems it’s been earmarked for demolition.

Scores of people want to stay and contribute to the place they call home. When people like this can’t afford to to make ends meet, we lose more than just another expat.

Nima Abu Wardeh is the founder of the personal finance website cashy.me. You can reach her at nima@cashy.me

Why making ends meet simply isn’t enough for UAE expats struggling with rising costs

http://www.thenational.ae/business/personal-finance/why-making-ends-meet-simply-isnt-enough-for-uae-expats-struggling-with-rising-costs

We came in 2000 with promise and hope

We’re leaving this month being strung by a rope

The rope of high costs, bad mortgage and loans

No cash in the bank, down to the bare bones

This ode is for all, who like us are in stress

Don’t leave it too late to get out of this mess

Before you read on, you might well just say

“It’s all your own fault, why on earth did you stay?!”

After 14 long years of blood, sweat and tears

We couldn’t just run leaving all the arrears

If you’re struggling and stressing over bills you must pay

Just wrap it all up and call it a day

This is part of a poem I was sent in response to my column last week “Expats priced out of their lives”. It nails it for every single person who reached out to me having read the piece.

The message is clear: people are in pain. Today I’d like to share what I’ve learnt from the responses. Two things come up throughout:

• People are having difficulty “hanging on”, as someone put in a tweet to me.

• The serious and ongoing ramifications as a result of the financial crisis and the resulting economic dive in 2009 are now coming to a head.

This is a smattering of what was shared:

“We felt like wallets with legs.”

“My descriptor for ‘the only way to be in the UAE’ is to get a safe and secure salary, guaranteed housing, schools paid for, just do the job you are paid for and, sadly, don’t invest any of yourself into the country.”

Seeing as those who wrote in were mainly entrepreneurs or professionals who don’t get their outgoings covered, this makes sense.

The things is, we’re dealing with an ongoing conflict of wanting to invest – at the very least emotionally – in where we’re living, while “knowing” that one day we will leave.

This is how one astute person put it:

“After you’ve spent more than five years here, you stop thinking of it as a working holiday-in-the-sun and start thinking about it as a long-term proposition.”

This is the story of another entrepreneur who certainly thought of the UAE as a long-term home, albeit temporary: since 2008 he has ploughed more than Dh10 million of profit back into the UAE. Two decades on he’s throwing in the towel.

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“My original long-range plan was to live in Dubai until 2025, I’m just leaving 11 years early. Why? I can’t pinpoint any one thing that pushed me over the edge on one fell swoop. It has been about three years coming, more and more discontent, more and more discussing the value of being in Dubai vis-a-vis somewhere else.

“In April of this year our sponsor told us he was going to change the terms of our agreement and wanted more money. Then our trade licence that we have had with no problems since 2007 kept getting rejected over and over again, then our warehouse landlord raised our rents by nearly 100 per cent. At that point my CFO got fed up and recommended we close shop since our profit margins had dropped to very low single digits. I held out for four more months but I’m now done. It just isn’t worth it any more. “

The key for success is sustainability. The ability of people to sustain themselves, and if they can then by default a city can sustain itself too.

Not too long ago, people suffered the immense stress of having to leave their lives behind either because they were pushed – downsizing, going bust and so on – or because they ran. No one wants that to happen again.

Back to the entrepreneur: “Would I do it all over again? Yes. What would I do different?”

Well, suffice to say that he would have prioritised his ‘forever home’ as a place to invest in.

He ends with this:

“Don’t get me wrong, I’m not leaving Dubai destitute but I sure am a lot less well off then if I had left in 2008-09 or even if I hadn’t started any of my companies. Sad but I’ll pick myself up and do it all over again.”

This person isn’t living hand-to-mouth – but many here are. There is a clear call for help from a growing number of expats, along with a desire to make things work for them so that they can continue to live and work in the UAE.

While you think over your own situation, I will leave you with another line from the poem:

We defended this town saying how great it will be

At the end of the day, it’s just “Me, Me, Me, Me.”

Nima Abu Wardeh is the founder of the personal finance website cashy.me. You can reach her at nima@cashy.me


Dragana stopped blogging?

I’ve found this search term on my blog today “Dragana stopped blogging”. Please, be informed that I didn’t stop blogging, I just said everything that I had to say.

As a result of my articles EKAS department is freed from bullying and unprofessional behaviour of a bad mannered and uneducated person by the name Anoma Manuel and following HR SVPs were terminated from the service:

  • Sophia Panayiotou, Senior Vice President Human Resources Business Support,
  • Katarina Ciumei, Senior Vice President Human Resources (Remuneration and Planning),
  • Rick Helliwell, Vice President – Corporate Leadership and Talent Management.

Although all of this means that I was right all the time, nobody from EK called me to apologize or to fulfil their obligations towards me. This speaks enough for itself. There is nobody in Emirates Airline capable enough to lead the company anywhere else than in the complete and total human resource disaster and maybe a bankruptcy as well. Of course, nobody will believe this until it actually happens.

I got offers from some EK passengers who want me to open a special page for them on my blog, where they can talk about bad customer service and negligence they are getting from EK. I am not sure whether to do that as damaging the image of EK was never my goal. Employees’ well-being is, on the other hand, my goal.

This web address is always open for everyone who wants to publish their stories and cases.

My e-mail address is dragana.blog.ek@gmail.com and if you are experiencing any kind of injustice or harassment and you want to talk about it in public (and anonymously), do not hesitate to send me an e-mail any time.


Failure of recruitment policy in Emirates Airline

Somebody has sent me this news recently, with just one question in the subject of the e-mail “Where is Emirates Airline?”:

Etihad, Fly Dubai named best airlines in the world. 

My answer was: Emirates is where they deserve to be. At the end of the day, every company is where they deserve to be. No doubt in that.

There are many lists made by many stakeholders, individuals or organizations. Many of them are pre-ordered and well paid for. Don’t believe everything you read. Whoever has the money, they will pay for their name to be first in magazines, internet searches and news. Make no mistake, Airline Industry is highly competitive. Too many airlines, too many flights, too expensive fuel. Some airlines have to take care of their employees because laws make them to. Some companies take care of their staff because they know that excellent customer service will give them competitive advantage in long terms, when things in the air start to be too overcrowded. Some of them decided to exploit people by paying them much less then they deserve or by asking much more work than staffs are paid for, in order to keep the planes flying. I will not ask the obvious question “which airlines are going to survive in the end?”, because the obvious answer is “the smartest ones”. It is always smarter to think in long terms, but not everyone is capable for that, especially when greed and false sense of power take over rational thinking.

So, I don’t know if this article was pre-ordered, but this choice is very well reasoned, and there are factual reasons why Emirates Airline is not in this article.

Arabian Business Article

Arabian Business Article

Etihad is on this list for its readiness to make partnerships with other airlines and this is very true. For example, Etihad has its shares in AirSerbia, and they became partners recently. There are no bigger doors to European Union than those, since Serbia is on its fast way to EU and they will pull Etihad with them.

Fly Dubai is known among Emirates Airline staff as a company where all staffs want to escape to. So, after two years of working in EK, staffs who didn’t resign already, massively apply for positions in Fly Dubai. Salary is bigger and it seems that Fly Dubai is really investing in their image by not letting just any scandal to go into public, unlike Emirates Airline.

But this is the thing nobody tells you at your Open or Assessment day in Emirates Airline: if you sign the contract with them, you’re stuck with them and you can’t change your (Middle East airline) employer for at least two years. EK has agreements with Etihad, Fly Dubai and Qatar Airways which forbid those airlines to accept EK staff unless they have worked with EK for minimum two years. This is just another human rights violation as well: you lose your right to choose an employer and you’re stuck with one or you resign. So, those of you who are still choosing which Middle East airline you want to work for, choose carefully as you can’t change it later or it would be very difficult at least. And, if your new employer is interested in you, as soon as they realize that you have worked for Emirates Airline, they will consider you either as “damaged goods” (if they know about awful working conditions inside EK and all the world’s airline insiders know about it) or “unreliable” (because you are leaving such a “good” company and “well paid” job; if they are not familiar with EK’s reality).

Frivolous recruitment policy in Emirates Airline

SVP HRBS's interview for HR portal

SVP HRBS’s interview for an HR portal

When SVP HRBS Sophia Panayiotou‘s contract was terminated recently,I have conducted a little research online and I’ve found some of Ms.Sophia’s interviews for HR magazines and portals. One is particularly interesting as it perfectly illustrates the emptiness of a recruitment policy in EK. If these unimaginative and stereotypical answers, without any concrete and meaningful fact given, were a recruitment policy for decades, then no wonder that EK has an internal disaster with staff’s turnover rate and resignations.

  • The whole interview is like transcribed from some HR Manual, without any understanding for the subject and EK reality.
  • For example, HR management has never tried to “retain” staff in the company. Their unofficial policy is “resign if you’re not happy”.
  • HR management’s “honest” communication with staff occurs only when they need to notify employees that Muslims will work less and be paid more during the Ramadan and that Employee Regulations Manual has been changed (without staff’s consent or signature). It is a one way and autocratic communication.
  • “Competitive salary, personal growth and benefits” are reserved only for managerial positions. All the rest get exploitation and undignified life and working conditions.
  • Surveys are really conducted every year, but their results are never published or presented as a feedback to employees. Ms.Sophia told in the interview that these surveys have high response rates, but staff never got a proof for this as we never got any feedback on our answered survey questions or complaints.
  • Ms. Sophia also said in her interview that all employees have a chance to meet an HR official and to talk with them, but when I sent her a complaint on workplace harassment she never replied nor she ever intervened when a group of staff complained about forced overtime and inhumane shifts. Nor her, nor any other HR manager whose basic role IS to take care of the staff.
  • Internal recruitment is just a phrase which has a meaning only when upgrading staff from grade 4 to grade 5 (which is, basically, the same). People for higher positions are recruited externally and existing staffs are kept on the same positions for years (unless they’ve managed to get wasta/connection inside EK management).
  • Higher salary is given to the people who have western or local passports, which is an outrageous example of a pure discrimination

When you go to Emirates Airline website, you can find a job opening. If you read it closely you will see that this opening was posted in January this year and is STILL OPEN for applications. This is due to huge staff turnover rate and massive staff’s resignations, so Emirates Airline is always short of staff. No company, especially airline company, is that successful to hire people for the SAME positions throughout the hole year.

Another failure of EK recruitment policy is presenting “living and working in Dubai” as a benefit itself. With money that you get as a salary, you can only watch others how they enjoy expensive Dubai and you can rarely travel with discounted plane tickets as you have no money to survive in Dubai and you have no time, since you are constantly working and sleeping.

Presenting “living in Dubai” as a working benefit just proves how lazy and uninterested HR managers are for doing the job they are paid for. This kind of policy has never intended to retain staff and make them happy, but only to use them and throw them back to their home countries when they are too exhausted or sick to work, with no medical insurance compensations and, very often, with no end of service money.

Job opening in Emirates Airline open for almost one year already

Job opening in Emirates Airline open for almost one year already

It turns out that Emirates Airline robes their own employees in order to have money for sponsoring all the football and tennis teams and events where their brand is advertised. 

The failure of recruitment policy in EK lies in the fact that they’ve got better employees than they deserve. Someone would argue that this is not a failure. I would reply that it is a big failure when you fail to keep those people in the company and, moreover, you even manage to make them feel like they have no value whatsoever.